Travel, Uncategorized

Coffee, books and zines

Last Saturday I took the train down to London to spend the day with my good friend, Anahita. We met at uni but even though we now live far away from each other, we still make the effort to meet up as often as we can.

I love London. Every time I visit I find it such an invigorating place, with so much going on. After meeting at Euston (and stopping off at Boots to buy an emergency bottle of sunscreen), we headed to VX shop and café near Kings Cross for a chat over vegan junk food, before a quick wander by the canal and then heading to the British Library.

The British Library is an impressive modern building, which is free to enter. You need to apply for a pass to access the reading rooms, which we weren’t there for, but we had a look around one of the exhibition rooms. It featured old manuscripts – I was particularly interested in the display of Marx’s old letters and documents, including one of his tickets for the reading room at the British Museum.

We managed to nab the last available table in one of the library’s cafes so we could sit and have a good catch up over a soy latte. It’s useful for me know now where the British Library is and what it’s like in case I ever need to access the reading room for research.

somerset houseOur next stop was Somerset House, located right by the Thames. When we arrived late afternoon there were dozens of children in swimwear jumping around in the fountains in the cobbled courtyard while their parents sunbathed nearby. Who says you need the coast for summer fun?

We were there specifically to see the free entry Print! Tearing it up exhibition. Exploring the history of independent magazines, with a focus on their modern relevance in a digital age, the exhibition featured hundreds of indie mags from the past century, with accompanying information about some of the publications. It was interesting to see old copies of magazines – like Time Out and Private Eye – that have gone on to become mainstream, as well as lower-circulation ones. I have been interested in zines for a while (I wrote in a previous post about making a zine for my MA), particularly as a medium for marginalised voices, so I really enjoyed Somerset House’s exhibition, especially the political zines.

I know that London is a great place for independent restaurants, but with not long before my train home, we headed for Pizza Express. Which was good. Even if they did put non-vegan salad dressing on their vegan pizza.

I’d love to return to London again soon to explore more cultural sites. We only visited the one exhibition at the vast Somerset House – I’d like to have a look round the rest sometime. But, of course, sunny Stoke has its own cultural gems, some of which I still need to visit. Lots more day trips are on the cards!

 

Uncategorized, Workshop

Creative Writing Workshops

I’m running two creative writing workshops over the next few weeks as part of Festival Stoke, celebrating the arts in Stoke-on-Trent.

On Wednesday 28th June, 7-9pm, Workshop One will explore characterisation, with ideas for choosing and developing a character, using every day experience for inspiration.

On Wednesday 5th July, 7-9pm, Workshop Two will focus on the famous show, not tell technique, looking at how we can make our writing more interesting and engaging.

Both workshops are free to attend and are open to all, whether you’re an experienced writer or just want to give it a go.

As mentioned in my last blog, I’m also running a free zine making workshop as part of the festival, on Saturday 5th August, 11am-3pm.

I’ve got lots of preparations to do for the workshops, and I’m really looking forward to meeting other writers and helping them develop their work. I love running workshops – I love talking about writing, so it’s a joy to get the opportunity to do this.

 

MA, My Writing, Uncategorized, Workshop

Zine Module and Zine Workshop

I’m doing an MA in the Teaching and Practice of Creative Writing at Staffordshire University and last week I handed in my latest assignment in the form of a zine.

zineIn his book Notes From Underground:: Zines and the politics of alternative culture, Stephen Duncombe explains that zines are “non-commercial, nonprofessional, small-circulation magazines which their creators produce, publish and distribute by themselves” (Duncombe, 2008, p10-11). They can be on literally any topic, from a favourite hobby to a political cause to writing about your life. I made my zine Interruptions for my module about my experiences of mental ill health, drawing on a variety of techniques. The main feature of the zine is a piece of life writing, and for this I used the Surrealist technique of automatic writing, where you write freely on a topic, as this helped me to get to the root of what I wanted to say without censoring myself. I also used the Dada cut out technique, taking reports that have been written about me, cutting the words out and rearranging them, so that I reclaim what’s been said about me.

I am drawn to using zines as a medium for my life writing as I love the physicality of zines. The researcher and author Alison Piepmeier talks about a gift culture around zines, where zinesters benefit from making and receiving zines. My friend Anahita and I have exchanged handmade art before – I made her a zine as a graduation present, filled with in jokes, a recipe for vegan tiffin, collages of Simpsons quotes, and photos. I like to – because I am vain like this – imagine her rummaging through her room and stumbling on the zine which she flicks through and smiles at the memories.

Anahita and I are running a free zine making workshop together in Stoke-on-Trent on Saturday 5th August, 11am-3pm. You can find out more and book on Eventbrite, and there’s also a Facebook event page. It’ll be a fun creative session and it’d be great to see you there.