Books

What I’m reading

I spend a lot of time reading. I have a lot of reading to do for my PhD: often memoirs, as my research is into life writing around disability, and then also academic texts on areas like literary theory and disability studies. I’m really enjoying my research, but I’m also making sure to give myself time each day to read something non-PhD related. For half an hour each night before I turn the light off, I love losing myself in a good book. It’s nice to have this bit of ‘me time’, and it helps me unwind and relax at the end of a busy day.

Here are some of the books I’ve been enjoying recently.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M Danforth

I read a lot of young adult novels. Partly because I write young adult fiction and so it’s useful to be familiar with it, but also because I genuinely enjoy it. One of the best young adult novels I’ve read recently is The Miseducation of Cameron Post. As well as the way it so deftly deals with LGBTQ+ identity and discrimination, I also loved this novel for its beautiful writing. The vividness of characters and place (it’s set in Montana) is so well done, and I was immersed into this evocative, powerful book.

A Snowfall of Silver by Laura Wood

A Snowfall of Silver is linked to another of Laura Wood’s young adult novels, the gorgeous A Sky Painted Gold, which I absolutely adored, so I was very excited to read this when it came out a couple of months ago. Set in the 1930s, it sees eighteen year old Freya leave her sleepy Cornish home and travel to London with the hopes of becoming an actress. Laura makes the historical setting so real and enticing, and I immediately warmed to the humour and enthusiasm of Freya and the other characters. It’s a believable, touching story by one of my favourite young adult authors.

The First Person and Other Stories by Ali Smith

I love a good short story collection. I think it’s the way you can experience a short story in one sitting, and how a collection can take you through so many different lives. I haven’t read enough Ali Smith (I desperately need to read her much-praised seasonal quartet) so decided to give this collection a try. I like the slight surrealness of some of the stories, the unexpected directions, and the way she addresses questions of perspective and narration.

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

Over the past few months, my lovely sister-in-law and I have been recommending each other books. I love hearing her thoughts on books I mention to her, and trying the ones she suggests. Reading is naturally quite a solitary thing, so having someone to send WhatsApp voice notes to where I share how I’m finding her recommendations is really lovely, and so far we’ve had some great conversations and seen much-loved books from new perspectives. A Thousand Splendid Suns came highly recommended, so I started reading a couple of nights ago. It is set in Afghanistan and follows the story of Mariam, a young woman whose story I’m already feeling so drawn into and moved by. I’m only a few chapters in, but I can tell this is a novel that deserves the high praise it receives. I’m looking forward to reading more.